Creating Installer For Mac

The macOS High Sierra is the newer version of Apple’s operating system which is still vastly used and loved by users. macOS High Sierra was launched and put out back in 2017 WWDC. But even with the newer versions, there are still lots of users who wants to install High Sierra. Because most users whose Mac aren’t compatible with can download and install in their old Mac. Users can install macOS High Sierra on their old Macs and make use of it. Here’s how to Create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB installer on Windows.

  1. Create Mac Os Installer Usb
  2. Creating Installer For Mac Installer
  3. Create Mac Os Bootable Installer
  4. Creating A Bootable Installer For Usb Mac Os

You can install macOS High Sierra on Mac, iMac, MacBook, and even Windows, Linux, and more. But for the most part, you’d need a bootable USB installer. Now sometimes you’ve access to Windows while your Mac isn’t working or have some problem. In this case, you’d probably want to create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB Installer on Windows. For those who doesn’t know, creating a macOS bootable USB installer on Windows is definitely possible and can be done with really simple steps with software like TransMac.

The macOS installer file is large with approximate size of 6 to 10GB depending upon the. A clean install can be very helpful to clear your Mac of any unnecessary system files that may have piled up over time or to speed up your Mac. Creating a bootable installer is very easy, and there are a variety of methods to do so. Follow the steps below to create a macOS bootable installer. Connect your drive to your Mac. Launch Install Disk Creator. In the main window, you’ll see a pop-up menu under Select the volume to become the installer. Click on the menu and select. Creating bootable USB Installer can be done in different ways specifically create bootable USB Installer for macOS X El Capitan on Windows and other macOS versions. The first way to do manually and the second way is to do a software that is pre-build to do all those with a click or two.

  • Related:How to Create macOS Catalina USB Installer on Windows

A bootable USB is required for quite lots of things like installing macOS High Sierra on PC via Hackintosh, or installing High Sierra on Mac or Macs. Hackintosh is an act that allows users to install and use macOS on PC. A bootable USB is required for installing any operating system. Not only macOS High Sierra but you’ll also need a bootable USB drive to install new versions of macOS Mojave, macOS Catalina, and updated versions.

A bootable flash drive is an external hard drive or optical disk that is created with a computer operating system and can be used to boot a desktop computer or laptop instead of the Windows installation DVD. The USB drive has replaced bootable disks. Before USB drives were on-trend people used to use bootable disks instead of bootable USB drives.

What is The Need of USB

A USB flash drive is a portable storage device that includes flash memory with an integrated USB interface. It is probably removable, rewritable, and much smaller than an optical disc. You can store any information, file, or any other file in a USB drive.

You can write, erase, or enter any information files and similar files or videos like that. You can find many USB flash drives with different storage space. USB flash drives are frequently used for storage, data back-up, and transfer of computer files. The primary need of USB is to store, transfer and send files from one place to another better and quicker.

  • Related:How to Create macOS Mojave USB Installer on Windows

Beside it, you can create a bootable USB for installation purposes. If you want to install one operating system or dual boot that would be to work both of them like; macOS and Windows. Another reason why you need a USB is, installing an operating system with USB is much easier and quicker.

These are also some other common reasons why do we need a USB. Some of them are, transferring a file or a bunch of files is easier with a USB. USB drives are like a backup drive of the files or documents that you have in. The plus point is that USB drives are way smaller rather than a computer or a laptop, and there are uncountable reasons why we need a USB drive.

What You’ll Need

Before we start the process of creating a bootable USB installer for macOS High Sierra we need some key items.

  • Access to Mac OS X or macOS (version 10.12 or later)
  • Bootable USB Maker TransMac
  • A 16GB USB flash drive

Not to miss one, recheck and pick all of them. Except for others, when its there, install TransMac straightly. Click next a couple of times until the installation screen and that’s it. You’ll see the finish window. So let’s dive into how to Create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB Installer on Windows.

How to Create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB Installer on Windows

Whether you want to install High Sierra or reinstall it because the first installation wasn’t successful or if you want to install macOS High Sierra on many Macs, you’ll definitely need a bootable USB. Here’s how to Create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB Installer on Windows.

After you download, install the required items. Then we are gonna create macOS High Sierra bootable USB installer on Windows.

Installing TransMac

After TransMac is installed, open it and insert your USB flash drive and when it appeared there, right-click on it and select Format Disk for Mac.

Make sure to select the USB drive to format as others are the Windows drivers so be careful.

First, take a backup and then follow here. Now enter a name for the USB and click OK. This part will remove everything from the device. If you haven’t take a backup of your files don’t follow this step.

Name Drive for Mac Volume

Right-click on the USB drive and select Restore with Disk Image.

It will ask you to choose a disk image to restore so you should click on the three dots and select macOS High Sierra DMG.

Browse DMG

After you clicked on macOS DMG it will open up a screen with macOS High Sierra DMG file. Click on the DMG file and press Open.

Wait for a little bit for the process to write the DMG file to USB drive.

Restoring image to Disk

After the process ends, your bootable USB for macOS High Sierra is ready. The process was simple and quick. Now you can install High Sierra typically as you’d do.

If you want to install macOS High Sierra on Windows, you can check out the article. You can also check out our similar articles to this like Create macOS Catalina USB installer on Windows, Create macOS Mojave USB Installer on Windows.

Creating a bootable installer for mac

That was how to Create macOS High Sierra Bootable USB Installer on Windows. We hope it was informative and useful. If you have any suggestions or questions related to this topic, you’re open to make comments below.

Mac

Disk Utility User Guide

You can use Disk Utility to create a disk image, which is a file that contains other files and folders.

Note: You can burn information to a CD or DVD using the Burn command in the Finder. See Burn CDs and DVDs.

Create a blank disk image for storage

You can create an empty disk image, add data to it, then use it to create disks, CDs, or DVDs.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose the format for the disk:

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac that has a solid state drive (SSD) and uses macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac with macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

    • If the disk image will be used with a Mac or Windows computer and is 32 GB or less, choose MS-DOS (FAT); if it’s over 32 GB, choose ExFAT.

  6. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose a partition layout.

  8. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Sparse bundle disk image: Same as a sparse disk image (below), but the directory data for the image is stored differently. Uses the .sparsebundle file extension.

    • Sparse disk image: Creates an expandable file that shrinks and grows as needed. No additional space is used. Uses the .sparseimage file extension.

    • Read/write disk image: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created. Uses the .dmg file extension.

    • DVD/CD master: Changes the size of the image to 177 MB (CD 8 cm). Uses the .cdr file extension.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder, copy your files to the mounted disk image, then eject it.

  11. Restore the disk image to a disk.

    For more information about disk image types, see the manual (man) page for hdiutil.

Create a disk image from a disk or connected device

You can create a disk image that includes the data and free space on a physical disk or connected device, such as a USB device. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 80 GB in size and include data and free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, select a disk, volume, or connected device in the sidebar.

  2. Choose File > New Image, then choose “Image from [device name].”

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

  5. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

Create Mac Os Installer Usb

Important: Don’t create a disk image of a disk that you believe to be failing or that contains corrupted information. The disk image may not serve as a reliable backup.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a disk image from a folder or connected device

Installer

You can create a disk image that contains the contents of a folder or connected device, such as a USB device. This method doesn’t copy a device’s free space to the disk image. For example, if a USB device or volume is 80 GB with 10 GB of data, the disk image will be 10 GB in size and include only data, not free space. You can then restore that disk image to another volume.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image, then choose Image from Folder.

  2. Select the folder or connected device in the dialog that appears, then click Open.

  3. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  4. To encrypt the disk image, click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  5. Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose an option:

    • Read-only: The disk image can’t be written to, and is quicker to create and open.

    • Compressed: Compresses data, so the disk image is smaller than the original data. The disk image is read-only.

    • Read/write: Allows you to add files to the disk image after it’s created.

    • DVD/CD master: Can be used with third-party apps. It includes a copy of all sectors of the disk image, whether they’re used or not. When you use a master disk image to create other DVDs or CDs, all data is copied exactly.

    • Hybrid image (HFS+/ISO/UDF): This disk image is a combination of disk image formats and can be used with different file system standards, such as HFS, ISO, and UDF.

  6. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

For technical information about creating a restore disk image, see the Apple Software Restore (ASR) manual (man) page.

Create a secure disk image

If you have confidential documents that you don’t want others to see without your permission, you can put them in an encrypted disk image.

Note: If you want to protect the contents of the system disk, turn on FileVault using the FileVault pane of Security & Privacy Preferences.

  1. In the Disk Utility app on your Mac, choose File > New Image > Blank Image.

  2. Enter a filename for the disk image, add tags if necessary, then choose where to save it.

    This is the name that appears in the Finder, where you save the disk image file before opening it.

  3. In the Name field, enter the name for the disk image.

    This is the name that appears on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar, after you open the disk image.

  4. In the Size field, enter a size for the disk image.

  5. Click the Format pop-up menu, then choose a format:

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.13 or later, choose APFS or APFS (Case-sensitive).

    • If you’re using the encrypted disk image with a Mac computer using macOS 10.12 or earlier, choose Mac OS Extended (Journaled) or Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).

  6. Click the Encryption pop-up menu, then choose an encryption option.

  7. Enter and re-enter a password to unlock the disk image, then click Choose.

    WARNING: If you forget this password, you won’t be able to open the disk image and view any of the files.

  8. Use the default settings for the rest of the options:

    • Click the Partitions pop-up menu, then choose Single partition - GUID Partition Map.

    • Click the Image Format pop-up menu, then choose “read/write” disk image.

  9. Click Save, then click Done.

    Disk Utility creates the disk image file where you saved it in the Finder and mounts its disk icon on your desktop and in the Finder sidebar.

  10. In the Finder , copy the documents you want to protect to the disk image.

  11. If you want to erase the original documents so they can’t be recovered, drag them to the Trash, then choose Finder > Empty Trash.

When you’re finished using the documents on the secure disk image, be sure to eject the disk image. As long as it’s available on your desktop, anyone with access to your computer can use the documents on it.

Creating Installer For Mac Installer

Creating Installer For Mac

Create Mac Os Bootable Installer

To access the data in a disk image, double-click it. It appears on your desktop, and you can add, remove, and edit files on it just as you would with a disk.

Creating A Bootable Installer For Usb Mac Os

See alsoAdd a checksum to a disk image using Disk Utility on MacVerify that a disk image’s data isn’t corrupted using Disk Utility on MacRestore a disk image to a disk using Disk Utility on MacConvert a disk image to another format using Disk Utility on Mac